FolkWorld #49: CD Reviews
FolkWorld #49 11/2012

CD & DVD Reviews

The Emperors of Wyoming "The Emperors of Wyoming"
Proper, 2012

www.emperorsofwyoming.com

Here is yet another heartland Americana country rock album. There’s just this one thing about the drummer… Butch Vig is better known for drumming in the hugely successful band, Garbage. And, oh yeah, he produced Nirvana’s “Nevermind”, Sonic Youth’s “Dirty” and a few other multiplatinum world famous albums. So ok, it sounds really good and Vig handles the less bombastic drumming patterns here just fine. But any true success will depend on the other players. Thankfully they deliver some top-notch vocals--expressive with range and not just shtick. The guitars are slide crazed (cooking red-hot as I like them); yet exhibit a lot of taste and jump in at odd points in the beat. The undulating moves create flowing patterns that really send the vocals to an even higher plateau. This could have been something forgettable, but instead like Jack White’s Raconteurs, it stands powerfully by itself irrespective of any of the famous history outside their world.
© David Hintz


Eamon Friel "The Streets Forget"
Thran Records; 2012

www.eamonfriel.com

Eamon Friel is a fine songwriter with his songs covered by many fine artists including Sean Donnelly and the Rhe Fureys. He has released many solo albums over the decades and offers up 11 songs here. When he brings out delicate folk songs like the title cut, he is successful and reminds me of a Harvey Andrews. When he moves into world or light rock formats, he is not quite as engaging, but I do give him credit for varying the formula. His lyrics and poetry definitely stand out and show why other musicians would gravitate to his songs. If you like songwriting craft, you should certainly give this a listen.
© David Hintz


Kyle Fosburgh "The Dreamer’s Eye"
Grass-Tops; 2012

www.kylefosburgh.com

This record starts off with a nice basic folk song, but quickly morphs into intriguing directions. “Oceans of Grace” show off Fosburgh’s guitar skills and clearly pay homage to his Takoma label influences of John Fahey and Robbie Basho. I also loved “A New Day was Breaking (In 1909)” with the light sitar touches and delicate vocals that reminded me of Perry Leopold or the lighter side of MIJ. Definitely some psychedelic moves are used here by this Minneapolis singer songwriter. And Robbie Basho is front and center as the influence on his spoken word over atmospheric guitar on “In a World of Nothing, Something”. I am such a fan of Robbie Basho that I am thrilled to see Kyle Fosburgh has brought this style back into play, as it is sorely missed. And you have not heard of Fosburgh or Basho, try them both.
© David Hintz


The Ready Stance "Damndest"
Own label; 2012

www.readystance.com

Back in the early 80s when I wanted to venture south to Cincinnati to see some great music, I would often head to cross the river into Newport, Kentucky, which, shall we say, had historically a harder edge club scene at work. Most famous was the Jockey Club where many a great show took place. Fast forward to now, and I receive this record from a band from Newport, Kentucky. There is nothing quite as punk or profound as the old Newport scene, nor is there any real folk here either, for that matter. What these guys do is blast out classic barroom rock that takes me back to other area bands of my youth like the Raisins (which became the Bears with Adrian Belew). No frills here, just straight ahead timeless well played rock music.
© David Hintz


Saor Patrol "Two Headed Dog – Duncarron Electric"
ARC Music, 2012

German CD Review

www.saorpatrol.com

No Roky Erickson covers, but this one is even stranger (well, maybe not as strange as Roky’s amazing story). There are three drums, a guy on bagpipes, and a guitarist. Truly, the only thing you need to know beyond the fact that there are a mix of instrumental originals and traditional arrangements, is that the guitar is fully electric and plays in a hard rock and even shred metal style. I think your imagination can do the rest. If you are like me, you will want to dig in and have a listen. The leader Charlie Allan is head of a charity designed to build Duncarron, a reconstructed medieval Scottish fortified village to provide historical and cultural education. Sounds great, and you can support it with some invigorating and original music as they display here.
© David Hintz


Tina Dico "Where do you go to Disappear?"
Finest; 2012

www.tinadico.com

Immediately, things seem simple enough, but careful listening reveals there are intriguing sounds at work. Danish singer songwriter Tina Dico is well established at having a fine voice, but the electronic arrangements are the interesting things here for me. There are the expected instruments like guitar and piano to counter with the vocal lines, yet there are also subtle electronic touches and surprisingly successful percussion (some electronic, some real). All of this allows the cool voice to establish just enough warmth to create a smooth atmosphere that feels edgy underneath the surface. This can work as pop music or something more indie and creative. The vocals are so good, but sometimes the lyrics show signs of second-language syndrome. But that is a minor point as there is great musical connection at work here.
© David Hintz


Skip & Die "Riots in the Jungle"
Crammed Discs, 2012

skipndie.withtank.com

Hip Hop sitar music? Well that is how this one starts. If that’s not enough, add some reggae moves and as much dance oriented music as you can. It rather devolves into more typical electronic dance music. Lovers of Ewan MacColl and Joan Baez, go elsewhere. Fans of modern electronica and dance music that want a more worldly approach, give this a try.
© David Hintz


Don Stiffe "Life’s Journey"
MSP; 2011

www.donstiffe.com

I was enjoying this folk record well enough from this Galway-born singer songwriter who has spent a lot of time playing in America. Then, right in the middle, some classic reels burst out from his guest fiddler. That was a nice touch, which especially offset the gorgeously melancholy song “The Promise of Spring” which followed. This featured Stiffe’s luxurious voice and delicate songwriting skills that merge the traditional with the modern. Yes, the Irish lilt on a fine singing voice scores a lot of bonus points with most folk fans, but Stiffe has a great way with a melody and an arrangement. He works some real magic with these songs and has a nice variety that keep me enthralled the whole way through.
© David Hintz


Firewater "International Orange!"
Noisolution, 2012

www.facebook.com/firewatermusic

Here’s another gypsy punk album, but Tod A. has been doing this thing with Firewater for a long time. He’s from the USA, but hardly bound here as he has spent a lot of time in Turkey and other parts of the world adding to his musical experiences. He has a bit of that solo Joe Strummer (post Clash) thing going on with international sounds and arrangements, but his voice is closer to the Saints’ Chris Bailey. And the horns do remind me of a slightly more worldly third Saints album sound (“Prehistoric Sounds”). It’s not as revved up as some of the gypsy music is, but bobs and weaves through interesting rhythms and arrangements. A few songs sputter a bit, but for the most part this one fires on all cylinders and is an interesting listen.
© David Hintz


Brigitte "Et vous, tu M’Aimes?"
3eme Bureau; 2011

German CD Review

www.myspace.com/brigittesisters

Cute French pop music here with a delicate electronic vibe as well. This can be stretched into folk music on some numbers that have an evocative chant quality, but there are also lighter songs with interesting vocal punctuations featuring female harmony vocals. They mix up the styles so you will likely find something that will pique your imagination. Extremely listenable, but a little like cotton candy. Enjoy it while you have it, as it will quickly dissolve into a sweet and slightly pleasant sensation.
© David Hintz


Ron LaSalle "When Hellhounds meet
Angels and other Sordid Love Stories"
PHQ; 2012

www.ronlasalle.com

Ron LaSalle is not just another blues player. I hear a lot of them and although this one seemed like just another decent record in the pile, I think he manages just enough boogie in the rhythms to make this a rather engaging record. There’s some great production with back-up vocals and delicate slide guitar, such as that in “The Devil Sneaks in”. His Dr. John like voice is something that works after a few listens and the competent band always seems to be on the mark.
© David Hintz


La Blanche Alchimie "Galactic Boredom"
Ponderosa; 2011

www.lablanchealchimie.com

This duo has an interesting modern take on pop music with a touch of the nu-folk sounds. In addition to keys and guitars, there are theremins, glockenspiels and other exotic sounds that spice things up a bit. The vocals are attractive and the music can cast its spell such as in “Spell on the Hill” which has a quick droning melody with soft male and female vocals on top of it. If Fit & Limo had gone into pop-land, yet retained some of the creativity they are known for, they may have sounded a bit like this. Fascinating sounds that will appeal to both fans of Joanna Newsome and/or Trader Horne.
© David Hintz


Daisy Chapman "Shameless Winter"
Songs & Whispers, 2012

www.daisychapman.com

It does not take too long into this album before you realize exactly how powerful Ms. Chapman’s voice is. The great part about it is that she can pull back in a delicate manner where just as it approaches fey range, she pushes it back up into powerful registers. You can appreciate the skill or just enjoy the emotional interpretation here. The arrangements are piano and violin heavy which creates a thick yet pulsating rhythm in addition to the steady drumming. There is even a near a capella song called “The Life of Mary May” which showcases just how good her voice is and still invokes some creative arranging. This UK artist can cross a lot of genres to win fans over as well as connecting with the singer-songwriter (or sinner songwriter as her web site points out) fans of the folk scene.
© David Hintz


Patrick Crowson “A Mile Past the Dead End”
Own label; 2012

www.patrickcrowson.com

Eleven songs of loner folk music here. Normally it is called 'loner stoner' folk music, but there seems to be more of a sober clarity here. Only the artist knows for sure, but at any rate, there certainly is plaintive lonesome singing atop guitars, distant harmonicas, and bottleneck chords sliding off deep into the desert horizon. The vocal work is different, but I get the same general vibe that I get when I hear Baltimore's Red Sammy. The moody world created here stays in a hazy focus throughout the eleven songs. My only issue may be the steadiness of it all. It's like a long drawn out passage in a Sergio Leone film, that while may be ten times as long as comparable scenes, but lacks the up-tempo change of pace at the scene's end. But I still find lots of colorful moments in this album. The album has a bit of a collage puzzle where I believe the song names are present. So I will skip the individual songs but recommend a listen for loner folk fans.
© David Hintz


Bellowhead "Broadside"
Navigator Records, 2012

www.bellowhead.co.uk

Crazed electric folk does not sound much better than this. With John Leckie (Radiohead and others) producing, the sound is big and bold, which makes sense for an eleven-piece band. There still is nice spacing between the instrumental bursts, which seemingly come from all directions. There are playful vocals throughout which have that crazy pub sing-along feel without being that obvious. This album starts out with a rousing “Byker Hill” and continues through with nearly all traditional arrangements the rest of the way. As fun as this, there is a lot going on musically to keep things interesting for even ‘prog-heads’. “The Wife of Usher’s Well” is a great example of creative arrangements as they manage to create a spooky pulsating rhythm while the melody is still addictive. Not only is this one destined for more replays, I need to explore their back catalogue further.
© David Hintz


The Way Home "On so Thin a Line"
Own label; 2012

thewayhome.bandcamp.com

Fresh after seeing this band live, I get a listen to the new album by this Philadelphia quartet. It is a fine representation of the songs they executed so well on stage. This band is not a genre bending niche band, but a classic rock band that sounds like they've worked their way out of a lot of small bar shows and frat parties into an excellent band that can handle the clubs or record songs that sound like classic 70s radio fare. The guitarist's lead vocals are soulful and emotive with three additional voices offering excellent harmonies throughout. The rhythm section is solid, the keys and guitar work well together and a good clean sound emerges. The album is not quite as flashy as the live set was, but that is often the case. I would certainly suggest a live show, and this would be a good souvenir to take home with you from that or just something to listen to even if they do not make it to your fair city.
© David Hintz


Justyn and the Babys "Big Really"
Own label; 2012

yandthebabys.bandcamp.com

Justyn WithaY is on guitar and vocals with a rhythm section filling out the Babys. The music is outsider psyche-folk, which is one of my favorite little sub-genres. The outsider vibe is due to a slight real world approach to sounds a bit more lo-fi and even a bit independent of the independents. This music is somewhere between Perry Leopold and Cosmic Michael, to reference some real obscurities. Basically, this is personal music played smoothly while walking on the edge. The rhythm section fills the bottom end with care and the vocal harmonies are at times quite interesting. I like the fact that these guys don't go precocious with this sound as many of the free folkers do. Instead, this is a little more 'out there' and not so self-conscious. I particularly enjoyed “Year of the Rat” with its classic psyche-folk vibe set up by delicately picked guitar, wailing vocals, and even Roy Harper-like songwriting shifts. This is a nice collection of songs that would fit well in a psyche-folk collection, new or old.
© David Hintz


Dwight Smith "Lateral Drifts"
Twin Lakes Records; 2012

These songs are less psychedelic folk than personal folk with playful instrumental additions that invoke a light psychedelia in the manner of Dulcimer, early Marc Bolan or Tir na Nog. The fragility is present throughout the songs and there is a slight uneasiness in the contemplative side here. Fey this is not. It is quietly presented, but there will be plenty going on in your mind as you listen. This album has 15 songs coming in at 32 minutes and with a couple songs passing the five-minute mark, most are quite short and at times not complete enough to my tastes. There were a few I wanted to continue and explore the musical themes further. Still, this is a fascinating personal take on folk music that is well worth a listen. Start out with “Sargasso Sea” with its childlike simplicity to the melody with all kinds of fancy instruments bringing a happy Tim Buckley style into the song (yeah, I'm not sure there is such a thing).
© David Hintz


Peter Fahey "Under the Sun"
Lotusdweller Records; 2011

www.peterfahey.org

Peter Fahey manages to infuse his folk songs with blues moves and some nice psychedelic touches as well. Although aided by the basic guitar, bass, and drums, he personally adds guitar, banjo, vibes, harmonica, melodica, glockenspiel, and toy piano into the mix. Thankfully they are not all played at once, although the thick rock sounds in “Finnegan” tend to create quite the din. He manages to shape shift his songs into many directions while keeping a deeply personal lyric and singing style. He appears to be the kind of musician that can play his songbook solo on a street corner or in front of a six-piece band in a full club. This album covers that range and manages to flow extremely well into a warm pool where the listener can float away.
© David Hintz


Mary Gauthier "Live at Blue Rock"
Proper; 2012

www.marygauthier.com

Mary Gauthier is a straight-talking (or rather singing) southern woman with an acoustic guitar strapped on. She excels at storytelling folk Americana country songs. Some follow the expected patterns a bit too much, but the quality is there and she unveils some gems in this live concert recording. “Sugar Cane” has a great melody and the story telling is broken up with a touch of harmonica and some strong violin runs. Although I a not a big fan of live albums, this one is recorded well and the performance is solid (and you never know how much of it is live, although these days it is much likelier to be 100%). You would be hard pressed not to find some very interesting material here, and if you are not careful, you could become a big fan.
© David Hintz


The Black Lillies "100 Miles of Wreckage"
Attack Monkey; 2010

www.theblacklillies.com

The biggest problem with this (and many other records) is that after the toe tapping, body swaying excitement of the opening cut “Two Hearts Down”, there is no where to go but down. Thankfully the Black Lillies have enough good songs thereafter to keep the spirits high and the mood playful and fun. This is barroom honky tonk Americana folk-rock with classic melodies, guitars battling fiddles over a quick beat. The vocals are heartland pure and there is not a note out of place. While not wildly creative, the brisk pace and quality musicianship keeps me in great spirits throughout these eleven songs. Cruz Contreras is the frontman of this Tennessee band and he had some success in Robinella and the CCStringband, so it is not too surprising to find this record to be as slick and on point as it is. And even for folk fans that do not care for things too countrified, check out the lovely folk ballad, “Tall Trees”.
© David Hintz


Penny Nichols "Colors of the Sun –
The early songs of Jackson Browne"
Own label; 2012

www.pennynichols.com

This is a record that explains it all right in the title. If you want to hear nice covers of early Jackson Browne songs done in female voice with light rock and folk accompaniment, then give this record. Ms. Nichols has a nice voice and gives each song its due. There is not much variety here and maybe nowhere to go other than the limitations it has by definition. There is nothing wrong with that and Nichols does well by choosing ‘early’ songs of the Browne songbook.
© David Hintz


Pat & Ricky Kelleher "All Mixed Up"
Own label; 2012

German CD Review

www.longneckmusic.com

It is hard not to appreciate a real family affair in music. There are many examples and combinations of that and with this record, it is a father (Pat) and son folk duo singing together, and playing guitars, banjos, basses, mandolins, and whistle. Two daughters also help out with the vocals on a few tracks. Pat Kelleher hails from Cork, so there is that great Irish accent on his fine singing voice. There are traditionals and modern songs and it all sounds like a warm and friendly night at the club or pub. Nothing too dazzling here, just good clean expressive folk music.
© David Hintz


Gilmore & Roberts "The Innocent Left"
Navigator Records, 2012

www.gilmoreroberts.co.uk

Katriona Gilmore plays a mean fiddle and adds her vocals to Jamie Roberts’ guitar and vocals. Contemporary folk mixed seamlessly with 1960s and 1970s folk is the sound that results. They have some acoustic bass and percussion that gives it a slight Pentangle/Albion touch. The first cut “Scarecrow” is, dare I say, quite brilliant for folk fans that love the cutting edgy folk created in the UK in the late sixties. The rest of the album is quite solid as they vary the styles while providing exquisite vocals atop solid instrumentation. This album succeeds in creating a sound that can be enjoyed by a wide variety of music lovers, while not sounding overly mainstream or cloying. I would imagine they would be great live, but if you cannot get to a show, this record will give you much enjoyment.
© David Hintz


Smokin’ Joe Kubek & Bnois King "Unplugged"
Delta Groove Music, 2012

www.smokinjoekubek.com

Here’s a blues record that will easily appeal to folk fans that don’t always want to hear a lot of straight-up blues. It is unplugged, but that is only the half of it. The guitar playing is amazing and there is both a straight-up rock vibe as well as a folksy feeling in the playing and the vocals. Sure, the blues is always in there; too, it is just that this duo sounds like they could play just about anything. And there are indeed plenty of pure blues songs and some innovative harmonica perking things up on occasion. The vocal work is good throughout and the songs are engaging. I would go out of my way to listen to these two play.
© David Hintz


Lauren McCormick "On Bluestockings"
Wild Goose Records, 2012

www.laurenmccormick.co.uk

Fans of Barbara St. John, Frankie Armstrong, and even Sandy Denny take note here. Lauren McCormick is here to handle classic folk songs either a capella or with light instrumental accompaniment. McCormick is a graduate of the Newcastle University with a Folk and Traditional Music degree, which sounds a lot more fun than my accounting degree. But she can physically as well as intellectually carry these tunes far better than I or many others can, so she has moved on to working with Shirley Collins and has also toured with Waterson-Carthy. In fact, Waterson-Carthy fans will really take to this, as the folk spirit is very similar here in voice and arrangements. There some originals and a Dylan and Cohen cover, as well. But with solid versions of “Trees Grow High” and “The Cuckoo”, I know which tunes I will be gravitating toward.
© David Hintz


Davey O. "Testing for Rust"
h30 Records; 2012

www.daveyo.com

Countrified folk is the general territory navigated by Davey O.’s slow and deliberate manner in conveying his stories via song. But he is capable of revving it up as well, especially in a bonus cut, recorded live. Hearts worn on sleeves, well put together singer songwriter material, etc… There are all the good things here you want, yet I am not sure this is something elevated to higher levels. This is the type of act I would enjoy on stage; as he clearly has something to say and can musically express it well.
© David Hintz


Lisa LeBlanc "Lisa LeBlanc"
Bonsound Records; 2012

Article: Bardentreffen 2012

www.lisaleblanc.ca

This French-language performer comes from New Brunswick, Canada. Rarely does the French language sound so tough. Of course, that is due to the skills and desire of singer/guitarist Lisa LeBlanc who pushes her heartland songs forward with bluesy rock intensity. There is a nice mix of electric and acoustic guitars in most songs with a punchy rhythm section and some keyboards. The band rocks nicely with plenty of heart and soul in their playing. This is sort of the heartland folk version of the Screaming Females (who feature a brilliant guitarist and a similar voice). There is some lovely finger picked acoustic guitar and voice songs like “Juste Parce que J’Peux” for the folk purists. No matter what direction Lisa LeBlanc takes with her songs, she and her band give a rousing performance and showcase great skill in bringing these songs to life.
© David Hintz


The Bluesmasters "Volume Two"
DMD; 2012

German CD Review

www.myspace.com/thebluesmasters

Thick professional slick electric blues is what you get in these twelve songs. You can also see how many of the players you identify in the band. I see Aynsley Dunbar is on drums for several songs long after his stint years ago in Journey as well as his own bands. Hazel Miller from Colorado also sings for Big Head Todd and the Monsters and Mickey Thomas from the Jefferson Starship is on a couple cuts. The rest of the band is spot on and this is all solid blues music with plenty of rock rhythms and volume. I enjoyed this more than expected because the band really had a drive to it.
© David Hintz


Mike Donaghy "I Wish You Well"
Own label; 2011

www.mikedonaghymusic.com

Irish, English, and American styles converge and meet here on this album. It is a full band sound, but there is airiness to the arrangements and a general softness to the vocals and approach. That is not a bad thing at all, when the singer has the fine touch that Donaghy does. It is never bland, although only a few songs jumped out at me. There is nice flow to the album and there is pleasure to be had in listening from start to finish. That works better than any one song, although there are a couple that seem to have some unique qualities worth revisiting.
© David Hintz


Volkwin Müller & Friends "Strawberry Songs"
Fuego; 2012

www.volkwin.de

The ‘Strawberry Songs’ in question are John Lennon or Lennon/McCartney or Lennon/Ono compositions including the song where the field runs forever. These are light folky versions with a few complimentary players and frankly, don’t over much more than creating a desire to go back to the originals. I did like the Klaus Voorman drawing on the cover. And “Working Class Hero” worked in this format. Otherwise, it is what it is and offers nothing more.
© David Hintz


The Mystix "Mighty Tone"
Mystix Eyes Records; 2012

www.themystix.com

Jo Lily and the Mystix take an assertive approach to the blues and American traditional songbook with this gutsy record. Basically, it rocks, especially in that late 60s early 70s soulful blues rock style. The keyboards on “Jelly Roll” really move in that liquid jazzy style making for some toe tapping fun. They vary the pace and intensity a bit from song to song making this an engaging listen. Not exactly new ground here, but a good combination of some familiar styles very well played. I often get a feeling that listening to a band’s record may provide evidence of a good live show. I think this would be a great live show.
© David Hintz


Jamaram "La Famille"
Soulfire, 2012

www.jamaram.de

This German band combines the latest gypsy rock moves with some ska beats, but somehow keeps a firm grasp of the reins, so the music is not too ‘out there’. That is quite an accomplishment as the easier path is one of least resistance, which is just to cut loose and go crazy. But this band handles within-song tempo increases with a steady hand. They have fun brass blasts, intense vocals, and mobile rhythms that are not overly distracting to the whole song. Check out the title cut for the full smorgasbord of sound and style. They do get a little safe and easy going later on in the album, but the songs are fine and likable. This an eclectic little mix of music that is worth a listen for people who like a shifting road on a scenic route.
© David Hintz


Svavar Knutur "Oldusloo"
Beste! Unterhaltung, 2012

www.svavarknutur.com

This little gem is one that is sure to attract a lot of interest for acoustic music lovers. Knutur has a lovely acoustic guitar technique, which he pairs with his delicate vocals. There is slightest of accompanying sounds to keep things floating on air throughout the course of these ten songs. Fans of early Donovan or Jose Gonzalez would do well to take note and give this record a listen. I wish he had a little more of that brazen gift for arrangement that Donovan had. There are a few chorale moments and other sounds that come close, but a couple more heavier arrangements would really round out this record. As it is, it is a highly satisfactory listen that will leave you feeling relaxed.
© David Hintz


Robert Morgan Fisher "Notes for a Novel"
Imperative; 2012

www.robertmorganfisher.com

Notes for a novel, indeed. LA based Robert Morgan Fisher is an active and prolific writer with novels, short stories, screenplays, and more. But he loves writing music, as well, so he presents 12 original songs on this album. You can sense the literary style even without knowing his background. Well, that’s a guess as I knew the background, but when you see a song called “Kissinger” based on a book by the late Christopher Hitchens, you can take a guess that Fisher has a literary bent. Honestly, his voice is not dazzling, but the music is well done. It’s home-made folk music and there’s some significant Americana moves on songs like “Oughta Be a Highway” which makes sense given Fisher’s Austin, Texas roots. The guitar playing is solid throughout and that with some clever lyrics keep my interest up.
© David Hintz


Tom House "Winding Down the Road"
Mud Records; 2012

www.tomhousesongspoems.blogspot.com

There was a baseball pitcher from the Atlanta Braves long ago who became an oddball pitching coach that went by the name Tom House. This is not he. I would continue, but I find baseball about as boring as people that don’t understand the game. And what’s more, this record is far better than any baseball game. Tom House plays his acoustic while singing his slightly nasal heartfelt lyrics with verve. He’s a great stylist that could easily command attention on a stage by himself. But thankfully he adds a great backing band who create a mystical dreamy setting not unlike that of a Woven Hand or even Six Organs of Admittance at times. And like Woven Hand, there’s some old time American style that comes through, in this instance it is old-time gospel music, particularly evident in “Willie MacBroom”. This one immediately heads to my relisten pile and I suspect I will be grabbing it often.
© David Hintz



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